For The Ninth Time This Month, Joe Biden Takes A Full Day Off Campaigning

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The Biden Campaign called a “lid” on the campaign trail by 9:20 a.m. Thursday morning, meaning the 77-year-old Biden will not make any in-person or media appearances for the rest of the day. This marks the ninth day this month the campaign has halted access to their candidate before noon with only 40 days to go until the Nov. 3 election.

Despite the campaign’s claim that Biden is beginning “formal debate prep” on Thursday, lids were still issued on eight other days in September without an explanation or specific reason.

While President Donald Trump spent the month traveling around the nation hosting rallies as well as managing his presidential duties including historic peace deals and nominating a Supreme Court justice, Biden’s campaign called a lid more than one third of the 24 days currently in September, halting his public activities and availability for the entire day.

The lids, reported by those covering the campaign trail, are often called on short-notice instead of announced as part of the campaign’s schedule. The frequency and lack of notification of the lids until the last minute raises questions about Biden’s ability to campaign, especially on days when there would normally be ample opportunity for a Democratic campaign to make headway such as in the passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Trump criticized the frequency of Biden’s lids, comparing Biden’s days off to Trump’s own hectic campaign schedule.

“Lid means he’s not going to be anywhere today. I’m working my a** off. I’m in Ohio, Texas, Florida, Michigan, Wisconsin,” Trump said at his rally in Pennsylvania on Tuesday night.

Compared to Trump, Biden and his campaign have significantly lagged in participating in on-the-ground campaign activities. Whether it is holding fewer rallies with fewer attendees or refusing to take questions from reporters, Biden’s lack of eagerness about his campaign is not lost on voters.

According to Dr. Kaycee Sink, an assistant professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, those struggling with cognitive decline can have “good and bad days.”

“Symptoms in dementia can wax and wane; people have good and bad days. Pain, changes in routine, and illnesses such as viruses or infections are all examples of things that can make symptoms worse temporarily,” Sink writes.

A study published by the Cambridge University Press found that symptoms of cognitive decline such as trouble formulating words were often associated with “bad days” and could lead to lower functioning.

“Good days were typically associated with improved global cognition, function, interest, and initiation. Bad days were associated with frequent verbal repetition, poor memory, increased agitation, and other disruptive behaviors,” the study stated.

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